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Gorgonian Gallery


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), just added to display tank (1st time)
Picture was taken in December 1999 with a Nikon Coolpix 950 Digital Camera, No Flash

Added to tank on October 11, 1999, given to me by Jim Fox (aka MiNdErAsR) making me a 3rd generation owner of this coral.

These are just beautiful with long flowing polyps that sway in the currents. This picture does nothing to show how nice this soft coral looks. There are three main colonies attached to the rock, the one in the middle is fairly small. The colonies are about 10 inches tall and 15 inches long.


17x Macro Closeup of Polyps. Picture was taken in March 2000.
Nikon Coolpix 950 Digital Camera with Tiffen +7 and +10 closeup lense, No Flash

Pictured here is a very close macro shot of the polyps. Picture was taken with a Nikon Coolpix 950 Digital Camera with a Tiffen +7 and +10 closeup lenses.


17x Macro Closeup of Polyps. Picture was taken in March 2000.
Nikon Coolpix 950 Digital Camera with Tiffen +7 and +10 closeup lense, No Flash

This is also a closeup of the Polyps, however its of a different colony. This colony was shaded slightly and the outer skin of the gorgonian is deep purple. Picture was taken with a Nikon Coolpix 950 Digital Camera with a Tiffen +7 and +10 closeup lenses.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp)
Picture was taken in August 2002 with a Nikon Coolpix 950 Digital Camera, No Flash.

This picture is nearly 3 years after the first picture. May not look like much growth but this coral has had cuttings for propagation removed many times. If you look carefully you can see two recently cut branches on the gorgonian on the right side.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), just added to display tank (2nd time)
Picture taken April 2005, Nikon D70 Digital SLR, Nikkor 18-70mm DX lens

This is one of my favorite gorgonians, commonly called a Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp.). This gorgonian has large fleshy polyps, grows rapidly and is very easy to propagate.

This is a 5th generation captive grown coral. Interestingly, I was also the 3rd generation owner (pictures above). The person I gave it to, gave me some cuttings off his colony for this tank.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), 8 Months Later.
Picture taken December 2005, Nikon D70 Digital SLR, Sigma 105mm Macro lens

This is the gorgonian to the far right side of the picture above 8 months later.

Most of this time was adjusting to the new tank conditions.

This coral fully expands its polyps again, has encrusted a new base and is starting to develop a new branch off the base.

The picture above shows 20kk lighting whereas this is 10kk 250w HQI halides. Not as blue, but brighter. This coral started to do very well under the lower Kelvin lighting. You can see where the gorgonian next to it died back but has started to recover.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), Feeding.
Picture taken December 2005, Nikon D70 Digital SLR, Sigma 105mm Macro lens

Some of the polyps can be seen with captured pray items. In this case it was from cleaning the front glass of diatoms.

I'm not sure what exactly it was catching. It could have been diatoms, bits of film algae, pods that were running on the glass, other organic material, etc.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), Ultra Close up.
Picture taken December 2005, Nikon D70 Digital SLR, Sigma 105mm Macro lens

An extreme macro zoomed in towards a single polyp on the side of the gorgonian.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), Nine Months Later.
Picture taken September 2006, Nikon D70 Digital SLR, Nikkor 18-70mm DX lens

This image shows the gorgonian colony nearly nine months later.

This is how it is supposed to look with elongated polyp extension.


Knobby Sea Rod (Eunicea sp), Ten Months Later.
Picture taken July 2007, Nikon D70 Digital SLR, Nikkor 18-70mm DX lens

This image shows the gorgonian colony over ten months later.

Several of the longer branches have been removed to reduce aggression with the surrounding corals.